Happy Birthday Elinor M. Brent-Dyer

It’s hard sometimes to quantify the influence that Brent-Dyer has had on my life. Clearly there are the obvious factors, such as my longing for every doctor to be both good in a crisis and rather dashing (and also a solid lump of comfort), and the fact that I now know enough German to order coffee and cakes and that I need to be careful of how much a cup of coffee costs in Swiss stations.

But on a more serious note, I think it’s in the way that she told me that children’s literature could do great and magnificent things.

I believe, very much, in the power of literature. You find your voice through reading. You find yourself through reading. You find yourself and your voice and you find out who and what you can be. I read children’s literature for a long time, but it was only in the past few years that I came to realise, and to be able to verbalise, how important that is.

And that, so much of that, is built on Brent-Dyer and her school of nations, her families of a hundred or more children with different coloured hair and eyes, her St Bernards, her ‘girls which keep falling off of mountains’ and of a voice that spoke in the darkness of world war two of acceptance, forgiveness, and truth.

The Chalet School was a multilingual school. A multi-faith school. A school where girls were allowed to be bold, and brave, and who they were and who they could be. That empowerment still astounds me. The way that Brent-Dyer, even in her painful, tired, last books was so concerned with letting her girls grow up and be strong, confident woman (and not spineless jellyfish).

She has given me so much. She has given me the support to write books about girls. About girls, and about women, and the golden, brilliant, lovely relationships between them. She has given me moments that have still, somehow, never been surpassed in my reading life. She has given me other moments which have made me cry and fold and hunt for my own vibrant orange handkerchief to stem my tears.

This is what a good author can do. Heck, this is even what a bad author can do and Brent-Dyer had her moments of both. This is what an author can do when you connect with them. This is what happens when you read and the gap between the page and you narrows to the extent that

This is why I believe that books are an opener of doors. That they are a gateway to the world and to beyond. This is why I will fight for the right for people to read, and to read what they want. It is for moments like this when I think back to the Chalet School that I dropped in the bath by mistake and patched it back together with tape and panic. It is for moments when I think how a reader can be made. How they can be formed. How they can be built and how they can be helped and how they can be saved, even by a woman who I have never met  and who has been dead for 18,827 days.

We stand on the shoulders of giants, you and I, and it is right to raise a glass every now and then.

Thank you EBD.

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5 thoughts on “Happy Birthday Elinor M. Brent-Dyer

  1. EBD has made me so many friends, taught me about a world where nothing is black and white, made it clear that you should do what is right rather than what is easy long before JKR did.

    We also share a birthday. I was meant to be a Chalet Girl.

  2. I am a huge EBD fan! I’m sixteen, and I’ve read each and every CS book three times, plus all the fill-ins to date. Girls Gone By Publishers is my literary goldmine.
    The Chalet School taught me how to construct a book, about the dynamics of relationships, how to alienate your teachers for refusing to write anything but 1930s boarding school – but also about how most people are good people waiting to be coaxed into a fruitful existence, and how important it is to be ‘well-rounded’: ‘work hard and play hard’. And the length of the series truly realises the microcosm EBD built up from two sisters in a foreign country. Finding out the Chalet School wasn’t real was possibly the most damaging event of my childhood!
    And in spite of all the criticisms of ‘old-fashioned’ school stories put forward, I so so wish I could pioneer their return in some form or other.

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